Let’s say you are spending $1million dollars on an advertising campaign.

If your creative gets 10% more of the audience to notice the campaign you could argue that the creative is adding $100,000 of value because it is making the media buy more effective and thus more valuable. This math is probably too simple, but the point is clear.

More engaging creative is almost always worth the investment. Yet many companies seem to believe that cheaper is better. Or if it’s homemade, which is even cheaper, it’s even better. 

Failure to recognize the difference between good and bad creative carries a price. That price could be any or all of:

  • Not getting attention
  • Not communicating clearly
  • Not properly reflecting product quality
  • Not generating appropriate response
  • Not helping create brand preference

There are more “nots”, but you get the idea. The answer is to raise your standards. Hire professionals who can create and professionals who can evaluate. Everyone has an opinion, but not all should carry equal weight. Trust your team, but also challenge your team to deliver work that delivers at the point of impact. 

November 22, 2017

Doug Davis,

Partner (Retired)

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A historic location

The historic 333 North Michigan Avenue Building was constructed in 1927 on the site of Fort Dearbon, the first Chicago settlement built in 1803. Fort Dearborn was strategically positioned along the Chicago River making it a prime location for travel and trafficking goods – and now it positions the building in heart of Michigan Avenue.

The first thing you notice is the unmistakable art deco design. It was derived directly from Eero Saarinen’s designs for the Chicago Tribune Tower and his Grant Park skyscraper proposal. A bas-relief frieze by sculptor Enrique Alferez winds around the building, commemorating Chicago’s pioneer past while adding exquisite detailing.

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